Blog 12

There are many citation systems. The one you use is going to depend on your major.

I will be using CSE in the future.

Be Consistent: Once you pick a style, you stick with that style only. 

Some students mix MLA, APA, and IEEE. Don’t make the mistake of numbering sources in MLA. That is done in the sciences. 

Page 651 covers this:

As Leketa Carter has said in English 1020, where she is a freshman student, it is important to “know your citation styles” (70). *period goes at the end of statement, including citation.

Page 3:

Many have also argued that we should teach more than MLA to our freshmen (Carter 22) *only need last name

 

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Blog 11

Most people would like to experience something fun and memorable for their last adventure before graduating and jumping into the real world. If you were to visit Chernobyl for your senior trip, you would be participating in what is called extreme, or dark, tourism. Some people would consider this trip a form of dark tourism because of the type of tragedy that happened there, which could teach you so much if you were to visit Chernobyl. So, what is extreme tourism?

Extreme tourism is defined as “going on holiday to extreme places or making holidays into extreme conditions in pursuit of more adventure.” Extreme tourism can include things like hiking up a steep mountain, visiting a forbidden place, or a place where a tragedy happened. Visiting a place where a tragedy happened would be a form or “dark tourism.” Places like this would include the 911 Memorial or visiting Holocaust Concentration Camps.

Chernobyl was nuclear reactor accident in 1986, leaving many people homeless and 31 dead. This accident left the small town inhabitable to this day. If you were visiting Chernobyl, you would be participating in dark tourism. You are actually only allowed to visit Chernobyl for a short amount of time. If you were there longer than that time period, you could be exposed to the radiation causing you to become sick. Chernobyl cannot even support animal life, but nature is beginning to take over the things left behind.

If you were to visit Chernobyl, you would receive a visual on what the Earth would look like if people were no longer here. Alan Weisman gave a written example of this in his piece called “Earth Without People” in our Green book. Weisman stated, “With nobody to trample seedlings, New York’s prolific exotic, the Chinese ailanthus tree, would take over.”(191) This quote is an example of nature, such as trees and plants, reclaiming what is theirs. In Chernobyl, nature is growing back without people around. In my opinion, this experience would be humbling and allow you realize the consequences of your actions, like destroying forests for new towns and cities.

Visiting Chernobyl would also allow you see what Russia was like in the 1980s. Residents were not given time to collect their belongings when the accident occurred. This means that the residents grabbed a few important things, leaving toys and pictures behind. Pictures of Chernobyl show remains of this Communist Russian town. By exploring Chernobyl, you would see how they lived like the toys they used, what the classrooms looked like, and also the apartments left behind.

While radiation levels can differ day to day, you never know if the land is safe to visit. If you were to choose to explore Chernobyl, you could risk wasting your money because visiting during that time could be prohibited. Also, you are not allowed to remove anything from the site because being in possession of something contaminated with radiation could cause infection in you.

There are many restrictions involved when you choose to visit Chernobyl. The Globe and Mail is a website that posted a few rules of visiting Chernobyl called, “Rule No. 1 when visiting Chernobyl: Don’t touch anything.”  You are not allowed to touch things, even yourself and personal belongings are not supposed to sit on the ground. Eating is hazardous while on the grounds of this abandoned town and advised to not eat outside. Jim Heintz, the writer of this article, stated, “Guides make sure the visitors understand that various spots in the zone are more contaminated than others and insist no one wander off the designated paths.”  I do not recommend the seniors of Auburn University at Montgomery to take this trip to Chernobyl based on the risk factors involved.

Blog 10

Most people would like to experience something fun and memorable for their last adventure before graduating and jumping into the real world. If you were to visit Chernobyl for your senior trip, you would be participating in what is called extreme tourism. Some people would consider this trip a form of dark tourism because of the type of tragedy that happened there, which could teach you so much if you were to visit Chernobyl. So, what is extreme tourism?

Extreme tourism is defined as “going on holiday to extreme places or making holidays into extreme conditions in pursuit of more adventure.” Extreme tourism can include things like hiking up a steep mountain, visiting a forbidden place, or a place where a tragedy happened. Visiting a place where a tragedy happened would be a form or “dark tourism.” Places like this would include the 911 Memorial or visiting Holocaust Concentration Camps.

Chernobyl was nuclear reactor accident in 1986, leaving many people homeless and 31 dead. This accident left the small town inhabitable to this day. If you were visiting Chernobyl, you would be participating in dark tourism. You are actually only allowed to visit Chernobyl for a short amount of time. If you were there longer than that time period, you could be exposed to the radiation causing you to become sick. Chernobyl cannot even support animal life, but nature is beginning to take over the things left behind.

If you were to visit Chernobyl, you would receive a visual on what the Earth would look like if people were no longer here. Alan Weisman gave a written example of this in his piece called “Earth Without People” in our Green book. Weisman stated, “With nobody to trample seedlings, New York’s prolific exotic, the Chinese ailanthus tree, would take over.”(191) This quote is an example of nature, such as trees and plants, reclaiming what is theirs. In Chernobyl, nature is growing back without people around. In my opinion, this experience would be humbling and allow you realize the consequences of your actions, like destroying forests for new towns and cities.

Blog 9.5

High School Structure:

Top Bun: Introduction

Meat: Body

Bottom Bun: Conclusion

Structure for Chernobyl Project:

Top Bun: Introduction

Lettuce and Tomato: Definitions paragraph (do everything you can to find scholarly definitions/source) – extreme tourism, examples here

Cheese: Background paragraph (the history) – Chernobyl history: what happened, when, to whom? (avoid technical terms that reader may not know)

Meat:

  1. Pros: 2 major reasons (each one paragraph)
    1. Mistakes: there are consequences
    2. Example of what Earth would look like without people (here is where you might bring in an example from the source in your book)
    3. Historical value of 1980s Russia: culture, language
  2. Cons: 2 major reasons (each one paragraph)

Bottom Bun: Conclusion (delayed thesis, where you recommend what to do)

Grading:

  1. Structure/Organization/Length
    1. Certain amount of points
    2. Making sure each paragraph has a single idea
    3. Finish each point/idea
  2. Research/Logos
    1. Balance/Variety of opinions
  3. Grammar/Punctuation/Spelling/Citations
  4. Lens/Rhetorical Situation
    1. Tone: semiformal

Blog 9

This article was written on the 30th anniversary of Chernobyl. It discusses the effects that Chernobyl had on the victims.

“Memories Painful on Chernobyl’s 30th Anniversary.” St.Louis Post – Dispatch, Apr 27 2016, ProQuest Newsstand, https://aumnicat.aum.edu/login?url=http://aumnicat.aum.edu:2155/docview/1784555168?accountid=6370.

This site will give you ideas on extreme tourism with videos and pictures.

“Extreme Tourism HQ | Nerve Rush.” RSS, http://www.nerverush.com/extreme-tourism/.

Blog 8.5

Topic: We will recommend whether a group of people should embark on extreme tourism.

Thesis: Research and findings on Russian expenses, dangers to health, and problems with travel have lead us to recommend that seniors at AUM should not participate in extreme tourism.

Try this instead: We recommend that seniors who want to visit Chernobyl consider both the positive and negative results of such an experience.

Cons:

  1. Radiation: They were stranded.
  2. They could’ve been mauled by a bear.
  3. Security did not allow them in the location.
  4. Some species do not live there anymore. (Ex: birds) – if you’ve read Silent Spring, you know that the absence of birds or other creatures means the land has been poisoned.

Pros:

  1. Scenery – abandoned, historical location – relics from the 1980s, incl Communist artifacts, education based on real experience
  2. Novelty – few people can go/rare experience, share photos
  3. Experience other perspectives by visiting another culture

Chernobyl Diaries. Directed by Bradley Parker, performance by Jessie McCartney, Jonathan Swadoski, Alcon Entertainment, 25 May 2012. Amazon Prime, add link from the site.

Blog 8

Deepwater Horizon spill, DDT and insecticides, Chernobyl, and Fukushima all share destruction to their surroundings. Each of these events has damaged things around them. The Deepwater Horizon spill caused damage to the Gulf of Mexico, making it unsafe for the animals and people for a period of time. DDT and insecticides killed animals in the environment because people did not think of the consequences. Chernobyl and Fukushima both damaged peoples homes, leaving abandoned towns.

 

Writing Workshop

  1. Pay attention to the rhetorical situation.
    1. Look closely at assignment sheets.
  2. Never forget your hierarchy.
    1. Always divide into paragraphs. (chunks)
    2. How would you divide up your itinerary? (By dates and times; be specific with details)
  3. Be specific about naming places, things, people.
  4. All containers, or larger things, need to be put in italics 
    1. (Ex: One Tree Hill)
  5. Stuff (smaller things) inside container is in “quotation marks.”
    1. Exceptions: The Bible (no quotations, no italics)
  6. In a research paper, do NOT bold stuff.

Blog 7

While reading from the “Green” book, I was able learn new things that I had not known before. I did not know about the true effects of pesticides or the huge controversy behind them. While growing up, I did not ever stress over what I was eating and neither did my parents. In today’s society, you see so many people eating “organic” foods in hopes to live a healthier lifestyle, but is it more healthy? I honestly have never gotten sick over something that I have consumed that people deem unhealthy due to it being a processed food. The fruit I eat and have eaten in the past has never hurt me to my knowledge. Yes, I know I have to rinse it off if I eat the peel, but does simply rinsing it get rid of what’s supposedly harmful like a pesticide? I feel like we, as human beings, are doing more harm to the environment than a pesticide. We are killing animals’ habitats to build bigger cities and destroying the air around us by removing trees and building more factories. I think there are bigger issues out there that are more important to stop. At least these farmers that still use pesticides are doing something productive with nature besides laying concrete over it and destroying it.

Blog 6.6

Plagiarism is really about personal motive. Are you pretending to know something you don’t?

The weather in Montgomery is either too hot or too cold. When you wake up in the morning it is freezing, so you dress in layers. When 2:00 comes, the heat is almost unbearable and you are stuck in the layers unless you packed a change of clothes.

Something that I like about Montgomery is that the weather is never cold enough to snow. I am able to walk almost comfortably year round in light layers. I do not have to buy big, bulky jackets just to survive outside.

Brooke Watts, my friend from English 1020 who is 19 years old and lives in Prattville, believes that our weather is “bipolar.”

Keanna Pelt, my friend from UNIV 1000 and English 1020 who is 18 years old and from Montgomery, likes our summertime weather.

Dear Liz,

I personally like our weather in Montgomery because it I do not have to spend money on big, bulky jackets. It is February 1st and our temperature is 70 degrees outside. I am walking around campus in shorts and a t-shirt. Although, our weather does tend to be too hot or too cold, but I feel like you would adjust well to it. Brooke Watts, my friend in English 1020, agrees with me and feels like our weather is “bipolar.” On the other hand, Keanna, my friend who lives in Montgomery, loves our summertime weather.

I believe that moving here would be a wonderful experience for you. You would be able to experience wonderful weather year-round, unlike North Dakota.

Hope to see you soon!

Sincerely,

Brooke Smith

2.6.17

  • Consider different perspectives and represent them fairly: Horton Hears a Who example
  • “A person’s a person no matter how small.”
  • Don’t ever twist someone’s research or story to fit YOUR NEEDS.

Taking care of the environment – we’d cite Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring.

Reasons to Cite Others:

  1. Ethos: we’ve done all our research
  2. Show Disagreement (opposing view)
  3. Place to find definitions, themes
  4. Comparable instances

Chernobyl – 1986

Ex: Fukushima in 2011 (if you could not find enough info on Chernobyl, you could look up a similar place and compare)

As Bob Smith from Newsweek say, “…” or look at BB “They say, I say” Templates

Blog 6

Plagiarism is a scary thought as a student in general. My concerns for it is whether or not I am citing a source correctly, or if I am using too much information from a source. While writing essays, I am typically always extra careful when sourcing. I tend to double check my quotes, making sure they are correct and if I have cited them.

My high school teachers always stressed the consequences of cheating. They would even scare us with saying, “If you do that in college, you’ll get kicked out and won’t get into another college.” This made me extra cautious when writing a paper, especially for my dual enrollment classes. I thought that if I was accused of academic dishonesty, that my college career would be over before it began.

Overall, I hope to learn more on the proper ways to cite something. I also want to know the correct way to quote something from a specific paragraph in a paper or journal. I am also curious about what happens when you plagiarize unintentionally. I understand that most institutions have different punishments, but what is the usual punishments for this act? I would also like to learn better note-taking skills when conducting interviews. What tips do you have for this process?